Archive For The “Ness Job” Category

SUCCESSFUL INTERVIEW SKILLS TRAINING

Mahru Norton

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN?

 

  • HOW TO GET THE JOB
  • YOU WILL GET A PROVEN 10 STEP PROCESS FOR SUCCESS IN AN INTERVIEW
  • YOU WILL PREPARE FOR JOB INTERVIEWS LIKE AN ABSOLUTE PRO
  • TOOLS AND TIPS THAT YOU WILL LOVE
  • HOW TO PERFORM DUE DILIGENCE, PREPARE FOR SUCCESS AND CHALLENGE YOURSELF
  • HOW YOU CAN LEVERAGE ON FEEDBACK AND YOUR MISTAKES
  • VALUE FOR MONEY. GUARANTEED
  • A HIGH QUALITY LEARNING EXPERIENCE
  • A GUIDE/PROCESS TO FOLLOW
  • JOB INTERVIEW SKILLS TO HIT THE GROUND RUNNING.

 

THIS TRAINING WILL HELP YOU:

  • TO GET SKILLS WHICH HELP YOU TO WIN YOUR COMPETITORS
  • TO RECEIVE FEEDBACKS FROM THE TRAINER AND ITS RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ADJUSTMENT OF ITS CONDUCT DURING INTERVIEWS
  • TO RECEIVE METHODICAL MATERIALS
  • TO GET SKILLS OF SUCCESSFUL INTERVIEW.

 

Trainer - Mahru Norton (director at NESS CO, human resources specialist).

 

                                                                                                                                             Duration: 2 DAYS

    Contact numbers:

Tel: (994) 12 492 15 50

Mob: (994) 51 435 94 32

                                                                                                                                             (994) 50 268 30 96

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5 Things You Should Never Say at Work

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Your words could be sabotaging your goals.

 

What you say at work could be inadvertently standing in the way of your goals. Expert Tara Mohr, author of Playing Big, says to banish these five words from your work vocabulary, stat. 

 

1. "Just." We love throwing "just" into sentences: "I'm just concerned that..." "I'm just wondering..." We do this when we're feeling apologetic or awkward, when we're worried about being too forward, when we feel as though what we say has to be justified. Hear how powerful these statements sound without "just" in them: "I'm concerned that..." "I'm wondering..."

 

2. "Sorry, but..." There are times when it's right to offer a sincere apology, but many women unconsciously apologize for taking up space, saying something, or even asking questions: "Sorry, this is a silly question, but..."

 

3. "Actually." "Actually, I think..." "Actually, I disagree..." The word "actually" makes it sounds as though you're surprised that you disagree. Linguists call these words — "actually," "just," "almost" — hedges, and research shows low-status people use more hedges than high-status folks.

 

4. "Does that make sense?" This suggests that you didn't make sense — not that you expressed complex and novel ideas that your audience might need to think about. You can still check in to make sure others understand by asking in a more direct way, "Do you have any questions or thoughts?" without diminishing yourself. 

 

5. "I'm no expert, but..." You know these: "I'm just thinking off the top of my head, but..." "You've been thinking about this a lot longer than I have, but..." We use these disclaimers out of our conditioning to be humble or because our thinking is in progress, and we want others to know that. But we can convey this without making ourselves look less than. "Let's do some brainstorming, here are my thoughts..." is very different from using qualifiers that tell your listeners what you're about to say is likely to be wrong.

 

 

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